Who Am I?

…and why I love what I do.

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I started out as a data analyst, first playing in MS Access, and quickly moving to MS SQL Server. I also became a developer in the ASP.NET stack, way back in the 2.0 days (2006-07). Yet I found myself drawn to the data more than the code, for some reason. Perhaps it was the beautiful simplicity of the relational model. Or the myriad of variations that something as simple as an name field could contain & how challenging it could be to massage that “dirty data” into something elegant and consistent for the code to easily manage and present to the user. Or it could have been the thrill of analyzing a workload that may have taken several minutes to run, and then, by applying the right combination of indexes, relations, and set-logic, to bring that workload down to milliseconds.

This job was great. First “real” job out of college; a teeny-tiny software shop, 4 devs & the boss, working with K-12 school districts, making their lives just a bit easier when dealing with the vast swath of standardized testing and government-imposed student performance metrics that ultimately decided how they taught & how they got funded. And we grew, slowly but surely – 5 devs, then 6, then 8. We got to wear so many hats! Developer, Data Analyst, Helpdesk, Tech Support; even Printer, Delivery Crew, Trainer. It was truly a well-rounded experience.

As the years went by, it felt like family. And sure, every family has the occasional episode of dysfunction. But we were in it together, building up the business with passion, commitment, and respect. And those of us that were there since the start, we felt like we knew it all. Because we did; in that little microcosm, we truly were the experts. And each of us had a forte – I was the “data guy”, he was the “self-taught developer”, she was the “tech-evangelist / UX dev”, and he was the “dev architect”. Our best hire came soon after – the “young enthusiastic developer”, a true professional. Then there was our den-mother, bringer of snacks, paycheck-writer and book-keeper extraordinaire. And as always, the father-figure – the big kahuna, the boss man, who was more than willing to get his hands dirty and help with anything we asked him to.

That was a wonderful experience. In the near-decade I spent with that company and those colleagues, many of whom I consider my friends, I learned so much about technology, programming, databases, and business. And we welcomed more and more people into the family – the graphics & print-media design expert, the bright & cheery project manager, the ambitious salesperson, the kind & caring tier 1 support staff, the new data analyst, the veteran DB-dev, the expert architect, the UI/UX dev, the student dev, and even the Russian programmer! (They’re amazing, BTW.) Each & every one of them added value, and taught me something new.

I do not regret a single day of it. It was awesome.

But, as the baby bird has to eventually leave the nest, I needed to venture out, to get outside my comfort zone and see what else was out there, to join a new & different team and environment, to see if I was truly as good as I thought I was. Well, I think we all know the answer to that! (Hint: it’s “nope”.)

Actually, it’s been great – I drank from the proverbial fire-hose, learned a lot in a short time about a completely new line of business & a familiar but larger & much more complex tech stack & environment. So in general, I’m actually enjoying not being “the go-to guy” for every little problem that happens with the database.

And you know what else I discovered? I am pretty darn good at what I do. That’s a good feeling!

But I’m still the DBA. (Technically, one of two, but the other DBA is the company’s old-time-guru-turned-part-time-consultant). So in a sense, being that “go-to guy” hasn’t gone away, it’s just gotten much more manageable – there’s a larger organization of people around me that can help in many different ways. Whether it’s the old-timers with that tribal knowledge of all the hidden rules and nuances of the business, or the SysAdmin who can whip out a PowerShell script in less time than it takes to say “automation”, or the domain expert that can pinpoint exactly why something is broken because they literally “wrote the book” on that problem-space. So it’s really cool.

Plus, it gives me the space and the time to focus on getting really good at DBA stuff – performance tuning, report automation, data integrity, change management, backup/recovery, data security, all that jazz. I’m looking forward to really earning that “Senior DBA” badge – because even though that’s my title, I still recognize that I have a lot to learn. The landscape is constantly evolving – 5 years ago, this whole “Cloud” business was virtually (yes, that is a pun) unheard of; now it’s all anybody talks about. I “grew up” in an on-prem (that’s short for on-premises) Windows + SQL Server + IIS world; but now I’ve got my fingers on AWS instances (both EC2 and RDS), MongoDBs, a SSAS data warehouse, even a sprinkling of MySQL and Azure. Not to mention dozens of SQL Servers spread over 3 offices plus a data-center, and a ridiculously slick converged infrastructure platform called a “VxBlock”. The technology world just keeps getting bigger, better, faster, smarter.

And honestly, that’s why I love what I do.

Written with StackEdit.

Author: natethedba

I'm a SQL Server DBA, family man, and all-around computer geek.

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