What’s in a Name?

a thing by any other name… is a different thing.

Advertisements

Let’s just start with a universal truth:

Names matter.

What do I mean by that? In technology, specifically. Well, let me explain.

The name you choose for a thing – whether it’s a server, a database, an application, a service, a class, a file, a method, a function, a procedure, ad nauseum – that name is immediately and irrevocably in love with Edward associated with that thing. Even if you miraculously get to change that name somewhere down the road, it will still be (at least for a while) “formerly known as” the original name. Legacy teams will continue to use that old name until they’ve convinced everybody the new name is worth the trouble of switching all dependency references & documentation. Managers will continue to use the old name even longer because they’re not close enough to the tech to be aware of, let alone understand, the full implications of said name change.

you-keep-using-that-name
Enigo Montoya prefers easy and descriptive names, like “Six-Fingered-Man”.

So that’s why names matter. They’re a unique and semi-permanent identifier of something; they encapsulate the essence of that thing in a single word or phrase. And they become embedded in the business jargon and technology team lore. Such lofty expectations of such a simple (hopefully), short (usually), and often under-appreciated element of our field.

It’s unbelievably easy to find bad examples of IT naming schemes, too. Just look:

I don’t know about you, but I like my names to be pronounceable. I don’t want to need dozens of syllables and two extra breaths just to say a couple server names in conversation. It’s not hat hard to create meaningful multi-part names that are still phonetic. We speak these things just as much as we type them, let’s make them speak-able!

Thus, once again,

Names matter. REALLY.

And so, dear reader, choose them wisely, with care and consideration. With lots and lots of context. Maybe even some conventions, or at least conventional wisdom. And consistency. Plan for the future, while being aware of the past. Don’t let legacy remnants stand in the way, but don’t let delusions of grandeur force you into a naming scheme that breeds confusion or resentment.

dilbert-namingconventions

Allow me to illustrate. We have a handful of SQL servers as part of our core IT infrastructure. Let’s call them FooDB, BarDB, and CharDB. Now, they each serve a fairly distinct and semi-isolated set of apps/websites. In other words, they each fill a role. (Of course, there are cross-dependencies and integrations, but nothing extreme.) Now, we want to migrate them to new hardware and plan for scale, assuming the business keeps growing. So what do we name the new servers? We know that SQL Server doesn’t really scale horizontally, at least not very easily & not without major application rewrites. But we don’t want to draw ourselves into a corner by assuming that we’ll “never” scale out. Ok, how about this: DC-FooDB-P1, DC-BarDB-P1, etc. The P stands for production, because, along with the fancy new hardware, we’ve got some additional infrastructure room to build a proper Dev & QA environment.

 

dev_test_prod_white
Seriously. You need tiered environments. That’s a whole ‘nother blog post.

So what have we planned for? Tiered environments, as well as a bit of scale-out room – 9 servers in each “role”, so to speak. What if we grew to the point where we needed 10 servers? Well, as a DBA, I’d argue that we should consider some scale-up at that point; but also, to seriously start looking at a broad infrastructure revamp, because that kind of growth should indicate some serious cash influx and a much higher demand on IT-Dev resources.

will-this-scale
Don’t ask me what happened to rules #1-5. I don’t know, I didn’t read the article.

Why should the breaking point be 10 and not 100? or 1000? Well look, it definitely depends on the technology we’re dealing with. SQL server is not Mongo, or Hadoop, or IIS, or Apache. Certain tech was made to scale-out; other tech is more suited for scale-up. And there’s nothing better or worse about either approach – both have their place, and both are important. Scale-out is arguably more important, but for traditional IT shops, it’s also more difficult.

This is where that big C-word comes in. Context. If we’re talking about a tech that scales-out, sure, leave room for 100 or 1000 of those cookie-cutter instances that you can spin-up and shuffle around like cattle. But if it’s a scale-up tech, don’t kid yourself by thinking you’re going to get to the triple-digits.

star-wars-episode-vi-han-solo
Delusions of grandeur… we all have them!

The point is, if you’re starting at 1, it’s not too difficult to scale-out to a few more “nodes” with simple tricks and tweaks; i.e. without drastically changing your IT-Dev practices and environment. But when you start talking multi-digits, of redundant nodes fulfilling the same role, you need to seriously PLAN for that kind of redundancy and scale. Your apps have to be aware of the node topology and be concurrency-safe, meaning “no assumptions allowed” about where they’re running or how many other instances are running simultaneously. And since we’re talking about database servers, that means replication, multi-node identity management, maybe sharding, data warehousing, availability groups, and other enterprise-level features. We’re talkin’ big $$$. Again, it stands to reason that if the business is seeing the kind of growth that leads in this direction, it can afford to invest in the IT-Dev improvements required to support it.

show-me-the-money

I’d love to know your thoughts! Leave me a comment or two. Until next time!

Header image: Keira loved her little pet penguin… and then later she destroyed it and literally ate its face off.

Drafted with StackEdit, finished with WordPress.

Author: natethedba

I'm a SQL Server DBA, family man, and all-around computer geek.

3 thoughts on “What’s in a Name?”

  1. Yes i agree names matter alot! In every sense. Actually remebering someones name forms a positive connect with them.
    And here I am, struggling to remember names even though I know them well.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s