5 Things I Learned at SQLSaturday

Go find a SQL Saturday near you, at sqlsaturday.com!

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The weekend before last, I attended my 4th #SQLSaturday event; my 2nd in San Diego CA (the others were Orange County CA, which is equally fantastic, and a little closer to work, though about the same distance from home). If you haven’t heard of or been to one, check out the home page and find one coming to a city near you! They’re fabulous FREE training events for the MS data platform, including but certainly not limited to SQL Server. For example, you’ll almost always find Kevin Feasel talking about aRrr or Kafka or Hadoop.

Did I mention free?

So I thought I’d share a few things that I learned this time!

The LinkedIn app’s Killer Feature

Did you know? The LinkedIn app has a “find nearby” feature that uses magic your phone’s various radios to instantly connect you with a fellow user who has the app open near you. It’s awesome! Now you don’t even have to look up from your convention coffee and security-blanket (phone) to network — just fire up the app, go to the People tab, hit “Find Nearby”, and commence trolling. =P

No, that’s horrible; be a normal human and talk to people. The tech is just there to help make the post-conversation connection.

linked-in find-nearby button

Storage Myths Busted

This was an interesting and even slightly entertaining session presented by Max @ SQLHA. One analogy that really stood out to me was this:

SANs have become a bit like the printer industry — You don’t pay a lot for the enclosure, the device itself, i.e. the SAN box & software; but you pay through the nose for ‘refills’, i.e. the drives that your SAN vendor gods deem worthy of their enclosure.

It’s frighteningly accurate. Ask your storage admin what it costs to add a single drive (or pair of drives, if you’re using something with built-in redundancy) to your SAN. Then compare that cost with the same exact drive off the retail market. It’s highway robbery. And we’re letting them get away with it because we can’t evolve fast enough to take advantage of storage virtualization tech (S2D, SOFS, RDMA) that effectively makes servers with locally attached SSDs a superior architecture. (As long as they’re not using a horribly outdated interface like SAS!)

Data Protection and Privacy is Hard

But completely necessary. We all need to become security practitioners to some extent. Even if it just means raising and documenting our concerns to our bosses. The great state of California has even jumped on the bandwagon with its very own privacy act. Still in the early stages, yet on the heels of GDPR, it can only mean that there will be more to come.

A few concrete action items from this, which should be “fairly simple” (with a big ol’ asterisk that says “depending on your organization and your change-management process”).

what if i told you you don't need 'sa'
For anything. Ever.
  1. At least encrypt your database backups. (And make a plan to implement some kind of “full” encryption across the data estate, be it TDE or AE or app-driven encryption via your developer teams.)
  2. Stop using sa! Reset the password, and disable it. Yes, your Agent Jobs will still run just fine.
  3. Disable Named Pipes & Shared Memory protocols; just use TCP/IP. Disable the SQL Browser service.
  4. Cut off your SQL servers from the public Internet (yes, you should still patch them; just download the patches to a fileshare and install them using PowerShell!). And stop letting people run SSMS on the server; that’s what client machines are for!

Columnstore All The Things!

Seriously. If you’re not using them yet, read about them, play with them, and start using them. They’re magic.

Okay, that’s a bit dramatic. As with any technology and feature, you need to know the WHY. Understand what the best use-cases are and how that translates to your own environment.

columnstore all the tables
Easy there sparky…

Here are just a few of the tips I gleaned from the session on this:

  • They were designed for data warehouses, but…
  • They’re also great for “operational analytics” — where you want to do aggregate reporting on your ‘live’ data, but that performance usually kinda sucks (and you don’t want to lock up those tables anyway).
  • Best with SQL 2016 or higher; 2012’s “v1” implementation was horrible, and 2014’s “v2” was semi-usable but still had some major drawbacks
  • Best candidate tables are “very large” (millions of rows or more), and best candidate columns have “low cardinality”, meaning they’re not full of unique values — they should be “compressible”. A simple example would be a Customer’s “State of residence” — you probably have millions of customers, but only 50-ish “State”s, and your typical report is asking “Hey, how many Customers per State ‘do X'” — that’s a great candidate for a columnstore index.

Users Don’t Like Date-Pickers

I mean they’re still better than text-entry boxes, but we can do better. Talking about SSRS here — reporting services, i.e. “the poor-man’s Tableau”.

Picture a typical business user, middle-manager type, going to your SSRS report that you just built for him/her. The first thing it asks them to do is “pick a start-date and an end-date” to define the “reporting period”. But you should know by now that they almost always want to see the current Fiscal Quarter. So you default them to those dates that define the current quarter. Great!

Now they want to quickly compare to the previous quarter, or the same quarter of the previous Fiscal Year. Ruh-roh. Nobody wants to go messing with those lame date-pickers with the pop-up calendar thing.

Give them a clickable label instead, which says “Compare to last Quarter” or “Previous Fiscal Year”.

The click action should be to “drill through” to the same report, while changing the (now internal/hidden) date parameters to the appropriate dates. Presto! The user only had to click once to get exactly what they wanted. Much nicer experience.

I’ll try to have a future post going into detail on this. I’ve got tons of ideas swimming around in my head after FishHeadTed‘s excellent SSRS classes, and not nearly enough time in the day to flesh them out.

i see what you did there?
Get it? Swimming, fish?!?

Stay tuned, and go find a SQLSaturday near you!

T-SQL Tuesday #102: Giving Back

This month hosted by Mr. Major (scribnasium / @RileyMajor), whose past #tsql2sday post I may have missed but I love it all the same (BeyondCompare FTW!).  It’s about giving back to your community — mostly technical, i.e. the #SQLFamily / MS Data Platform community, but it can be about any community you’re a part of.

For starters, that’s what we blog for, at least partly.  I mostly blog about things I’ve learned or found interesting in my work, so that I don’t forget them later!  Of course, I’m always happy to learn that it helps someone else out there with a similar problem.  But there’s so much more to a community ecosystem than that.

SQL Saturday

SQL Saturdays are the perfect example of this.  I’ve been to 3 so far – 2 at Orange County, and 1 at San Diego.  I have to call out OC’s organizers, Ted Stathakis & .. the other guy.  Crap, I forgot his name.  He’s awesome though.  Srsly.  I talked with Ted a bit after a session at the last one and he truly is as nice as he is busy – 3 boys, all kinds of volunteer work, AND a full time job as the BI Director at Del Taco!  Wow!

I mean, it’s no Taco Bell, but still, Del Taco!  (Sorry, I had to..)  =P

I really want to volunteer to help at one of these.  I’m not sure what I’d do, but I know when the time comes, it’ll be worth it.

Lunch & Learns

To get my feet wet, I hosted a couple “lunch & learns” at my company with my Business Analyst and Development teams.  We talked about some basics, ranted about formatting a bit, tried to say goodbye to old habits from the SQL 2005 days (hello, date type!), and even dived into a few juicy things like performance-testing with IO stats and why you should never use scalar or multi-statement functions.  We also had a couple heart-to-hearts about DevOps and what it means in our environment.  (Hint: we’ve got a LOOONG way to go.)

At some point I’m going to scrub my slides and post them on SlideShare or something.  I just have to remove any company-specific info first.  ;o)

As with most teaching efforts, it helped me learn (and re-learn) some things myself!  I had to read some documentation to get wording exactly right, and I built a few playground DBs on my local machine to try out different concepts & examples.  Plus, it forced me to justify WHY I held certain opinions or notions on things, and in doing so, realize my own mistakes of the past.  Thus, I became a better DBA just by reinforcing some good practices and updating my own assumptions.

the-more-you-know
Yay learning!

Generosity

If there’s one thing I’ve learned from the many tributes to our late #SQLFamily member SQLSoldier, it’s the importance of being generous with your time.  Whether that means answering to the #sqlhelp tag on Twitter, participating in the SQL Community Slack, answering StackOverflow / DBA.StackExchange questions, or just taking a few moments to help someone at your workplace with a tech problem — it all makes a difference.  I need to be better about this, as far as my “online presence” goes.  In-person, I’m always eager to help, but because I work remotely most of the time (yay!), it’s a bit of a moving-target — the in-office days get packed with meetings and critical face-time (not FaceTime), so the peer-to-peer stuff is often postponed or relegated to Slack.

However, there’s a flip-side to this.  In being generous, we can’t forget to prioritize ourselves and our families.  I’m always being asked “Why are you working so much!?” — well, I could try to explain the difference between ‘work work’ and ‘tech community involvement’ and ‘self-betterment / career planning’ but… yeah.

Sorry, honey, be done in a sec!  =)

Anyway..

I encourage you, dear reader, to give back to your own communities, in whatever form that takes — tech/online, real-life, etc.  I promise that it will benefit you in some new & unexpected way.  Plus, whenever you make a real solid connection with someone, that’s worth its weight in gold.

it's not what you know, it's who you know
ORLY? Yes, RLY!